Tasmanian Coast

Tasmania

Tasmania is gorgeous.  It seems no matter where you are or where you look, there is a picture-perfect scene before you.

Driving from Hobart to the Tasman Peninsula afforded many of these landscape views.

The first bridge in Tasmania was the bridge at Richmond, over the Coal River.  It was built by convict labor back in the 1800’s when Tasmania was a prison colony.

The Tasmanian coastline is impressive, it is an island, and there are many popular natural wonders along the coast on the Tasman Peninsula.

The Tasman Peninsula would be an island if it wasn’t for a thin strip of land, about 30 meters wide, that connected it to the mainland called Eaglehawk Neck.  On the left is Pirate’s Bay and on the right is Eaglehawk Bay.

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The first wonder is the Tessellated Pavement.  Some chemically worn away by the salt and some physically worn away by the surf, the sandstone has been molded into a checkerboard pattern

Since we were on the south coast of Tasmania, the body of water is the Southern Ocean.    Small tidal pools were dotted around the rocks filled with shells, rocks, periwinkles, etc. The water was freezing, but amazingly clear.  When I put my hand under the water, there was almost no visual distortion at all.

Next up is the Blowhole.  It’s a cave that sprays up water when the ocean waves are strong.

The waves were huge and we even saw some surfers out in the frigid water catching some.

There was also the Tasman Arch.  It started out as a cave similar to the Blowhole, but further erosion caused the back of the cave to collapse, turning it into an arch.

Devil’s Kitchen was the final phenomenon.  It is similar in construction to the Blowhole and the Tasman Arch but older.  It has collapsed and is now more of a cauldron where the waves crash and swirl.

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